The MAM Blog – Tapered Annual Allowance


Richard Johnston – Financial Planning Director

The Annual Allowance (AA) restricts the value of pension contributions that can be made by an individual in a given year and, for some years now, the standard AA has stood at £40,000.

Since April 2016, however, the AA has been tapered for those with high levels of income and the rules relating to it can lead to complex calculations being required to determine the AA that is to apply. Typically, the taper applies when income exceeds £150,000, but that is further complicated by the fact that employer contributions are also deemed to be income, and there is a get out of jail card which can be played if income, according to an alternative definition, is below £110,000.

At worst, the taper reduces the AA to £10,000, which is typically achieved once income reaches £210,000, as £1 is lost for each £2 of income above £150,000.

The taper is all the more relevant now because whilst AA rules may permit a person to carry forward unused AA from the previous three tax years, it is now the case that all of those years could be subject to the taper, so a separate calculation may be required for each.

The matter is even more complex for those with defined benefit pension schemes, because 1) a special formula is used to calculate AA usage and 2) it can be difficult to predict what AA usage will occur for a current tax year, in order to decide whether to make a top-up contribution to a personal pension.

It is, therefore, the case that the seemingly simple question of ‘How much can I contribute to my SIPP this year’ may, in fact, be a complex one that requires some time (and a good spreadsheet!) to calculate. For those who may be affected, it is important to assess the position sooner rather than later